Not Before 7 http://www.notbefore7.com Life as a Homeschool Nightowl Wed, 19 Sep 2018 16:05:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 92723913 Playing with Language: 10 Ideas for Families http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/09/03/playing-with-language/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/09/03/playing-with-language/#respond Mon, 03 Sep 2018 11:45:56 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4464 We love to play with language in our house. Words. Idioms. Jokes. Figurative language. It’s all part of the atmosphere of learning that we have created in this house and it is easier to create that you might realize. We repeat our favorite lines from movies and TV shows, share silly puns, attempt to solve riddles, and experiment with new vocabulary words. There isn’t a limit to the many ways you can play with words and language in your home. I bet you’ve already started to realize how much your family plays with language as well, so let’s talk about ten ideas you can incorporate into your family lifestyle. As part of our Brave Writer Lifestyle, we have embraced the idea of playing with language. It’s made me aware of the many ways we naturally play with words in our home. 1. Playing with Language: Read Poetry Poetry is full of figurative language, silly words, and delightful phrases. Keep a few books on hand to read at bedtime, in your morning basket, or on a random Tuesday afternoon. I have a special place on our bookshelf for our poetry books. Of course, there are times they wander off to another room or shelf for a while. I love that they are being used, and somehow, I always help them find their way back when a child is finished with them. Our top five favorite poetry books or authors are: Jack Prelutzky. The first book our family owned by Jack Prelutzky was The […]

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We love to play with language in our house.

Words. Idioms. Jokes. Figurative language.

It’s all part of the atmosphere of learning that we have created in this house and it is easier to create that you might realize.

We repeat our favorite lines from movies and TV shows, share silly puns, attempt to solve riddles, and experiment with new vocabulary words. There isn’t a limit to the many ways you can play with words and language in your home.

I bet you’ve already started to realize how much your family plays with language as well, so let’s talk about ten ideas you can incorporate into your family lifestyle.

Check out these easy ten ideas to play with words and language with your kids.

As part of our Brave Writer Lifestyle, we have embraced the idea of playing with language. It’s made me aware of the many ways we naturally play with words in our home.

1. Playing with Language: Read Poetry

Poetry is full of figurative language, silly words, and delightful phrases. Keep a few books on hand to read at bedtime, in your morning basket, or on a random Tuesday afternoon.

I have a special place on our bookshelf for our poetry books. Of course, there are times they wander off to another room or shelf for a while. I love that they are being used, and somehow, I always help them find their way back when a child is finished with them.

Our top five favorite poetry books or authors are:

These are just five of our favorite choices, but you can find all of my favorites on my poetry book list.

2. Playing with Language: Play an “Anytime, Anyplace Game”

These are the types of games that don’t require a board or a particular set of cards. You can play them while camping, at youth gatherings, or at a restaurant while you wait for food.

ABC Theme Game. The group should select a category. Choose a topic, a TV show, or a book title. Begin with the letter “A” and try to brainstorm a word for every letter of the alphabet suited to the chosen category. For example, if the category is “Harry Potter” then you might pick Albus Dumbledore or Avada Kadavra for the letter “A”.

Snickerdoodle. This game requires a pencil and piece of paper for each participant.

Ghost. This is a spelling game that can be played anywhere. I learned it around the campfire as a kid. The first person begins the game by stating a letter. The next person adds to the word with a second letter. Play continues around the circle as each person adds an additional letter. The goal is to add a letter WITHOUT spelling a word though you MUST have a word in mind.

NOTE: We do not count three letter words, but that is up to you!

On your turn, you can add a letter to the current line up or challenge the person who added a letter before you if you don’t believe they were spelling a word. If you spell a word when you add a letter, then you earn a “G”. If you lose a challenge, then you earn a “G”. After earning a “G”, you would earn an “H”, then “O”, until you have spelled, “Ghost”.

Once you become a ghost, then no one is allowed to talk to you or they become a ghost immediately.

For example:

Player 1: A
Player 2: B
Player 3: S

(We do not count three letter words, so “Abs” wouldn’t count and player 3 would be safe.)

Player 4: O
Player 1: (cannot think of a word that starts with Abso—) I challenge you, Player 4.
Player 4: I was thinking of the word “Absolutely”.

In this case, Player 1 would receive a “G” because they lost the challenge. The game would continue with a new round. 

3. Playing With Language: Board and Card Games

We love games that force us to think creatively about words and language. We’ve tried many games over the years and these are my top five favorites:

  • Codenames – There are so many fun variations of this game but we own and enjoy the original.
  • Dixit – enchanting illustrations encourage creative wordplay
  • Snake Oil – My kids laugh hysterically while playing this game.
  • Quiddler – A fun spelling game? Yep! 
  • Apples to Apples – a classic that is still a hit in our house.

You can see all of my favorite Language Arts games here.

4. Playing with Language: Read a Book that Plays with Words

Step away from the chapter books and bring home a few books that play with language. We have had a great time with the following titles and genres over the years:

  • Pop Sonnets. I read these out loud to the kids and they try to guess the pop song. It’s a great way to study Shakespearean language and the sonnet format while having fun.
  • William’s Shakespeare Star Wars. The Star Wars trilogy written in the language of Shakespeare. Need I say more?
  • OMG Classics. These clever titles rewrite classic literature using modern methods of communication, such as group texts, email, snaps, and emojis. These books crack up my kids, but please beware of some language (acronyms mainly) that are more suited to teens and adults.
  • Idiom Books. There are plenty to choose from such as the Dictionary of Idioms or In a Pickle. They are a great way to teach your kids new phrases and to play with words.
  • Joke Books. Kids love jokes and there a millions of choices. Grab a few and have a few laughs.

   

5. Playing with Language: Learn New Vocabulary

There are many ways to learn new vocabulary, including conversation and reading great books. But sometimes you might like to incorporate a more systematic way to learn new words.

Our family has had a great time playing with Marie’s Words. I keep them hanging on the door in the kitchen and we have a lifesaver reward system for those who use a word on the list.

UPDATE: Apparently Marie’s Words are very expensive right now. The Picture These SAT Words looks like a similar option for a reasonable price.

6. Playing with Language: Watch a TV Series Together

Wait. You mean TV counts?

Yes. Yes, it does. Watching TV and movies with your kids can absolutely spark language growth. Have some great conversations about the plot. Repeat the funny lines. Adopt the puns and jokes as your own.

Our family has enjoyed a ton of television shows together and we still repeat memorable episodes, lines, and scenes. Our all-time favorite series is still a top choice these days. Want to know what it is?

I’ll give you a hint…

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The Netflix series, A series of Unfortunate Events, is the most recent show we enjoyed that is littered with fantastic wordplay for our amusement. 

Well, at least my 11-year-old son and I find it amusing. The other kids roll their eyes.

7. Playing with Language: Have a Conversation

Everyday life provides plenty of opportunity for conversation with your kids. Observe the world together. Talk about an article that struck you as funny, a news headline, a book you read, or your plans for the day.

Ask your kids thoughtful questions about their day. For years our entire family took turns answering two questions at dinner:

What was the best part of your day?

What was the hardest part of your day?

Of course, that eventually evolved into a set of monthly conversation starters. Now my kids usually come up with their own creative questions at dinner. Most recently my 11-year-old son asked, “If you could ride on Zippleback dragon (2 headed dragon) with anyone dead or alive, who would you choose?” My husband and I discovered that we both immediately thought of my Gema!

Tools for Meaningful conversation with your family.

If you want some help getting started, you can check out the details of my conversation starters or simply start with the same two basic questions we used above.

In addition, subscribers to this blog receive a free set of “Would You Rather” questions that aren’t included in the set in my shop. Subscribe to this blog and download them for free.

8. Playing with Language: Mystery Quotes

My friend, Heather at Nerdy Little Birdie, has developed a creative way to play with language in her homeschool. Every week she writes a mystery quote on her chalkboard

She uses these quotes to highlight different literary elements. Her boys discuss the quote with her and try to discover the source of the quote.

Be sure to follow her Instagram account for more great ideas and plenty of quotes.

9. Playing with Language: Download an App

Apps are a great way to play with words. They are entertaining and they travel well in the car. We have recently enjoyed Word Bounce. In fact, I was quite addicted to this one during our 7,500 road trip this summer.

My daughter and I went through a phase of playing Words with Friends. It was a ton of fun.

Finally, I keep Word Warp on my phone for my own entertainment. The kids try to help me find works when we are waiting in doctor offices.

There are so many options. Do you or your kids have a favorite? Feel free to leave it in the comments!

10. Playing with Language: Read and Discuss Books

I know. This one is a bit obvious, but sometimes we need a reminder that the simple act of reading and discussing books is a powerful teacher. 

Our family enjoys using the Brave Writer Arrow and Boomerang Guides to guide our discussion of literary elements, vocabulary, and author’s craft. Every guide includes nine questions that guide our conversation. It makes it easy for me, though a guide isn’t necessary to read and enjoy a book with your kids.

Simply crack a book, read, and enjoy talking about it with your child.

Have fun playing with words!

Related Posts:

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Homeschooling 10th Grade: Our Plan for My Oldest http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/08/30/homeschooling-10th-grade/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/08/30/homeschooling-10th-grade/#comments Thu, 30 Aug 2018 17:20:31 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4451 I can hardly believe my oldest child is entering the tenth grade. This means that I am homeschooling 10th grade whether I am ready or not. HA! Independent courses. Drivers License. Working two jobs. She is growing up so quickly and it makes me truly grateful that we have bonus time together because she decided to remain enrolled in our homeschool for high school. Of course, as my oldest child and first high school student, she remains my guinea pig. I am thankful that we have her successful freshman year of high school behind us because it gives me even more confidence as we move forward. We are confidently proceeding forward with our plans for homeschooling 10th grade. Homeschooling 10th Grade: Planning {This post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosure.} This year I have used a few planning tools to gather my thoughts.  I started with the Minimalist Homeschool Book because it came highly recommended. I worked through each chapter and it really helped me focus on the core curriculum for each of my kids. Instead of trying to do “all of the things”, I am going to focus on the three core subjects and 2-3 additional subjects for each child. I also planned a minimalist focus for our family and group time. This book helped me develop a new perspective on how to narrow our focus in each season this year. A post shared by Mary (@notbefore7) on Jun 19, 2018 at 8:00am PDT Pam Barnhill’s Plan Your Year Kit is my go-to […]

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I can hardly believe my oldest child is entering the tenth grade. This means that I am homeschooling 10th grade whether I am ready or not. HA!

Independent courses. Drivers License. Working two jobs.

She is growing up so quickly and it makes me truly grateful that we have bonus time together because she decided to remain enrolled in our homeschool for high school.

Of course, as my oldest child and first high school student, she remains my guinea pig. I am thankful that we have her successful freshman year of high school behind us because it gives me even more confidence as we move forward. We are confidently proceeding forward with our plans for homeschooling 10th grade.

I've got all of the details of our plan for homeschooling high school: 10th grade.

Homeschooling 10th Grade: Planning

{This post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosure.}

This year I have used a few planning tools to gather my thoughts. 

I started with the Minimalist Homeschool Book because it came highly recommended. I worked through each chapter and it really helped me focus on the core curriculum for each of my kids. Instead of trying to do “all of the things”, I am going to focus on the three core subjects and 2-3 additional subjects for each child.

I also planned a minimalist focus for our family and group time. This book helped me develop a new perspective on how to narrow our focus in each season this year.

A post shared by Mary (@notbefore7) on

Pam Barnhill’s Plan Your Year Kit is my go-to kit for the downloadable forms that I need to organize myself and my high schooler. I use the Independent Student forms for my high schooler’s weekly schedule. It helps keep both of us on track.

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Homeschooling 10th Grade: The Academics


Homeschooling 10th Grade: Science (1 credit)

We are diving into Chemistry at home with a group of friends this year. I did a little digging and discovered Mr. Q’s Advanced Chemistry course. Mr. Q is a high school chemistry teacher and he designed a complete high school chemistry course using basic kitchen equipment and cooking recipes. 

No bunsen burner required.

And while Kayleigh might miss the classic experience of a bunsen burner, I suspect that learning Chemistry in the kitchen is going to be a lot more useful in life.

Mr. Q promises that his program covers everything you need to know in order to experience success in a college Chemistry class. I am taking him at his word.

Homeschooling 10th Grade: Math (1 credit)

After two years of feeling frustrated with our former math program for upper-level math, I was determined to find a better option. While I was a middle school math teacher, I no longer have time to teach an individual math lesson to four individual children in addition to all of their other subjects. 

I was absolutely thrilled to discover Mr. D’s Math. Mr. D offers a variety of math courses, beginning with pre-algebra. The courses are available online as self-paced or live classes and he has weekly help sessions included with both options.

After a conversation with Mr. D on the phone, I was convinced that this was his courses were the right choice for our family.

Kayleigh is registered for a self-paced Geometry course this year and it is working out beautifully. 

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Homeschooling 10th Grade: PSAT Prep (0 credits) 

NOTE: You could put together a Test Taking and Study Skills course for .5 credit and this could be part of it. I am not doing that at this time, but could use it as part of the credit hours if we change our mind.

We’ve decided to focus on PSAT Prep in September and October. This is Kayleigh’s first time taking the test and I want her to feel confident and prepared. The test is not required until your Junior year, but her scores can qualify her for free dual enrollment at the local community college.

Her fall testing experience will give us a baseline score so we will know if she is ready for that path. She has time to study and prepare a bit more if necessary to take the ACT or SAT in the spring as well.

I bought a standard Test Prep book so she can work through it.

NOTE: Reading Minimalist Homeschooling taught me that it is OK to acknowledge that PSAT Prep will be a core class for her in September and part of October. As a result, we will not begin her English class until the test is over.

I am 100% fine with this.

Homeschooling 10th Grade: Civics and American Government (1 credit)

She will take this course outside of our home with a local radio talk show personality. He will teach it in a way that I would not and he will use a text that I would not pick. In addition, his opinions don’t always reflect mine either.

That being said, he loves this topic and I do not. I have very little knowledge in this area and not enough time or interest to pursue it well and teach it at a high school level. Instead, I can walk the path with her and discuss the topic, adding my own opinions to his instruction.

The course will provide a good foundation for her, accomplish the credit, and create a few big, juicy conversations in our house.

Sometimes you have to pick what works. In this case, a class outside of our home worked well for the subject and our schedule.

She is taking it with a close friend as well, so there is that…

Homeschooling 10th Grade: Spanish (1 credit)

This is another course that she is taking outside of our home. A local homeschool mom offered to teach it at her home and I was happy to pay someone to take this topic for me.

I remember the alphabet. I remember the colors. And I can introduce myself and ask how you are.

That’s all I got. I am grateful for a local option, though there are many online.

Homeschooling 10th Grade: English (1 English credit plus .5 Creative Writing credit possibly)

Oh, let’s talk about the deep, deep beautiful ocean of English and all that it encompasses. There are just so many options, courses, book titles, and things to do. It’s hard to define an organized plan because I pull from a variety of options throughout the year.

These are a few of the teacher resources I am pulling ideas from this year:

If you are curious and want to know more about these resources, check out my Language Arts planning video.

Back to 10th Grade English. I’ll do my best to lay out the plan.

Writing

We will make writing our primary focus during the day in November. I am not sure what that will look like, but my high schooler will definitely participate in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).

I plan to have her take at least one Brave Writer Essay Course. She’ll probably take the Expository Essay class in the winter or early spring. Quite possibly she will also take a second essay course, but we will see how things are going.

I hope to design some sort of literature response journal for her as well. We typically use questions from the Boomerang Guide and other sources to write short and longer responses to literature.

The Little Norton Reader: 50 Essays from the first 50 Years has a lot of great options with invitations to respond at the end. This book was part of her Brave Writer Reading the Essay class last year and I loved how they approached each of the four essays. I learned a few skills to continue the same process this year.

Freewriting is an important part of our week. If the concept is new to you, you can read more about it on the Brave Writer page. I occasionally pick up books to inspire our freewriting adventures and this year I purchased two:

 

The Creativity Project is full of writing prompts and story starters created by award-winning authors and illustrators as well as the responses written by other at least one of the authors. I think this one will be a ton of fun for the whole family.

The Creative Writer’s Notebook focuses on the style of one particular author and invites you to imitate their style through writing prompts and exercises.

Literature 

Kayleigh will participate in the spring Brave Writer Literary Analysis Course.

My goal this year is to have her read 7-9 assigned books plus spend a month focusing on poetry. She will skip Shakespeare this year (I think) because she has read a play every year for three years.

We will dive in deep for at least three of these books. She will read and respond more briefly to the other books. We hope to find a few friends to bring together for discussion though no formal book club is planned just yet.

We will use the Brave Writer Boomerang Guides to guide our discussion for the majority of these titles.

In addition, I’d like to read 3-4 short stories and several essays throughout the year.

Another goal for high school was for her to read and discuss a memoir. We accomplished this by listening to Born a Crime by Trevor Noah while on our summer road trip.  I highly recommend the audio version so you can hear Trevor speak the various African languages.

Of course, homeschooling has taught me that it all counts, so a book we tackled on a cross country road trip counts!

Homeschooling 10th Grade: Mixed Media Art (.5 more credits to go)

We began using the Masterpiece Society’s Season Mixed Media Art Courses last year. We dabbled in several projects for each season. We will finish this up by dabbling in more projects this year so that she can complete one full Fine Arts credit in Mixed Media Art.

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Our entire family loves these courses and that makes this an enjoyable credit to complete.

Homeschooling 10th Grade: Leadership (finishing 1 credit)

Kayleigh began working on a Leadership credit last year. She has attended several hours of Leadership training for summer camp staff positions and for her gymnastics coaching. In addition to her hours at Staff training, I have a list of books for her to read in order to complete this credit. 

Homeschooling 10th Grade: Classroom Experience, Level II (1 credit)

Kayleigh will approximately 160 hours this year helping in the classroom during local homeschool classes. Working with kids is her passion and her time in the classroom is the highlight of her week and I plan to turn this into a credit for her.

When I was a senior in high school, I completed two credits in a mentorship program at a local elementary school. In my opinion, as a homeschool student, Kayleigh has the unique opportunity to complete 4 credits of Classroom Experience because that is definitely her first love.

Our goal is to find a local public school classroom where she can volunteer her time in the coming years as part of her four years of Classroom Experience courses.

Homeschooling 10th Grade: Theology/Worldview (1 credit over time)

It was my intention to begin work on this credit last year, but we failed. This course is back on the table and I plan to assign her a few books a year in the area of Christian Theology and Worldview. We will read these and have some Big, Juicy Conversations so that by the end of four years, she will have accumulated a full credit.

On the table for consideration:

Homeschooling 10th Grade: A Mom Reflects

Sometimes I get worried. And overwhemed. And freaked out.

I hear what sother kids are are doing at school (or at homeschool) and I worry that we aren’t keeping up.

I begin to doubt our homeschooling style and my choices and I begin to spiral out of control with worry.

I start to wonder if I should push harder or require more assignments or force more testing or make her write more or make her read more or…well, you get the picture.

Worrying is part of the process. I’ve learned to accept it and handle it. Sometimes I talk with Kayleigh about it and we make changes if we agree that is the best course of action. Other times I call a friend and they remind me why we chose this alternative path.

I didn’t homeschool her so she could run on the same hamster wheel of stress and activities and homework and crammed days as “everyone else” her age. I wanted an alternative path for our family.

Alternatives often feel worrisome because “everyone else” is sticking with the norm, but that doesn’t mean that the norm is the “right” way. It is just one of the many ways to accomplish the same goal of a foundation of solid education and life skills.

I try to remember this, but I’ll probably have to come read it to myself again this year.

We can remind each other. We’ve got this.

Related Posts that you might enjoy:

This post is part of the iHomeschool Network “Not Back to School” curriculum hop. For more posts about curriculum choices, check out the iHomeschool Network Curriculum Blog Hop.

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How to Play the ColorKu Board Game http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/08/29/colorku-board-game/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/08/29/colorku-board-game/#respond Wed, 29 Aug 2018 12:29:04 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4438 The ColorKu board game is a great game to teach your children. It can be played alone or with a friend, which makes it a perfect game to keep for a rainy day. The ColorKu board game is similar to Suduko, but uses colors instead of numbers. The same type of logical reasoning is involved so your kids will develop their thinking skills while having fun. How to Play: ColorKu Board Game Interested in playing? Buy ColorKu online.   Don’t miss any future videos. Follow my Facebook Page or subscribe to my YouTube Channel:  

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The ColorKu board game is a great game to teach your children. It can be played alone or with a friend, which makes it a perfect game to keep for a rainy day.

The ColorKu board game is similar to Suduko, but uses colors instead of numbers. The same type of logical reasoning is involved so your kids will develop their thinking skills while having fun.

Instructions, Tips, and Tricks for playing the ColorKu board game.

How to Play: ColorKu Board Game

Interested in playing? Buy ColorKu online.

 

Don’t miss any future videos.

Follow my Facebook Page or subscribe to my YouTube Channel:

Join me on Facebook for homeschooling tips and resources.

 

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Music Appreciation with SQUILT guides http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/23/music-appreciation-squilt-guides/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/23/music-appreciation-squilt-guides/#respond Mon, 23 Jul 2018 11:01:46 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4432 SQUILT music guides have been a perfect fit for music appreciation in our homeschool. We enjoyed the Modern Era guide during the 2017-2018 school year and we will select another guide for our next school year. Our Plan for using SQUILT Music Guides for our school year…. UPDATE: We loved our year using the SQUILT Music guides and we plan to continue using SQUILT for music appreciation in our homeschool. Don’t miss another video: Follow my Facebook Page or subscribe to my YouTube channel:

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SQUILT music guides have been a perfect fit for music appreciation in our homeschool.

We enjoyed the Modern Era guide during the 2017-2018 school year and we will select another guide for our next school year.

Our plan to use SQUILT music in our homeschool was a success. Check out our music appreciation plan in this video.

Our Plan for using SQUILT Music Guides for our school year….

UPDATE: We loved our year using the SQUILT Music guides and we plan to continue using SQUILT for music appreciation in our homeschool.

Don’t miss another video:

Follow my Facebook Page or subscribe to my YouTube channel:

Join me on Facebook for homeschooling tips and resources.

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Homeschool Planning for Language Arts http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/22/homeschool-planning-language-arts/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/22/homeschool-planning-language-arts/#comments Sun, 22 Jul 2018 11:59:28 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4424 Planning language arts in your homeschool can feel like a daunting task. Today I share some of the resources that I am using for my 10th, 8th, 6th, and 4th graders. {{This post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosure.}} Let’s Talk: Planning Homeschool Language Arts Homeschool Planning Language Arts Video Notes Planning Process Minimalist Homeschooling  Voxer App Tools for Planning Homeschool Language Arts Brave Writer  Readers Odyssey  Out of the Holding Tank  Grading with a Purple Crayon    Rooted in Language  – Annotating Literary Elements – Trees in the Forest – Explore a Story: Graphic Character Journal – Free plan   Language Arts Book Club Facebook Group **Current Title: Boy Writers  **July 2018 title: Poetry Matters    Less is More  Creative Writers Notebook  Grammar Resources  The Know-Nonsense Guide to Grammar  The Dragon Grammar Book  Everything You Need to Ace English Language Arts in One Big Fat Notebook Don’t miss another video. Watch them live on my Facebook Page or catch the replays on my YouTube channel.

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Planning language arts in your homeschool can feel like a daunting task.

Today I share some of the resources that I am using for my 10th, 8th, 6th, and 4th graders.

These are the books and resources that I am using to help plan Language Arts in our homeschool.

{{This post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosure.}}

Let’s Talk: Planning Homeschool Language Arts

Homeschool Planning Language Arts Video Notes

Planning Process

Tools for Planning Homeschool Language Arts

 
– Annotating Literary Elements
– Trees in the Forest
– Explore a Story: Graphic Character Journal
– Free plan
 
**Current Title: Boy Writers 
**July 2018 title: Poetry Matters 
 

Grammar Resources

Don’t miss another video.

Watch them live on my Facebook Page or catch the replays on my YouTube channel.

Join me on Facebook for homeschooling tips and resources.

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The Graphic Novel Choices for our Homeschool Year http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/21/graphic-novel-homeschool-year/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/21/graphic-novel-homeschool-year/#comments Sat, 21 Jul 2018 14:13:46 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4416 Who says you have to read only novels during your homeschool year? Not me! Normally read a variety of literature, including graphic novels, and it has become clear that my soon to be 14 year old prefers graphic novels above all other types of literature. As a result, we are going to spend the entire year reading and studying graphic novels in her English class. Let’s talk about my choices for a literature year focused on graphic novels. {{This post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosure.}} Video Notes: Comic Book Legal Defense Fund – general help for graphic novels Grab the Book Planning Page Sept: I Kill Giants  Hero’s Journey I Kill Giants Graphic Novel Movie  Oct: Persepolis Persepolis Boomerang Guide Nov: Speak – PARENTAL ADVISORY Speak: Graphic Novel Speak: Novel Speak: Movie December: A Christmas Carol A Christmas Carol: The Graphic Novel  January: Nimona Nimona  February: March: Book One March: Book One  March: Pashmina Pashmina American Born Chinese  April: Anne of Green Gables Anne of Green Gables: Graphic Novel Anne of Green Gables Illustrated Anne of Green Gables Audio Anne of Green Gables Movie Netflix Series – Anne with an E May – Don Brown Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans Great American Dust Bowl Older Than Dirt  Other series: The Olympians Amulet Bone Snow White: A Graphic Novel Drama Ghosts Piper Adventures of John Blake Maus Understanding Comics Grab the Book Planning Page Don’t miss another live video. Follow my Facebook Page or YouTube channel:  

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Who says you have to read only novels during your homeschool year?

Not me!

Normally read a variety of literature, including graphic novels, and it has become clear that my soon to be 14 year old prefers graphic novels above all other types of literature.

As a result, we are going to spend the entire year reading and studying graphic novels in her English class.

Let’s talk about my choices for a literature year focused on graphic novels.

{{This post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosure.}}

Video Notes:

Comic Book Legal Defense Fund – general help for graphic novels

Grab the Book Planning Page

Sept: I Kill Giants 

Hero’s Journey
I Kill Giants Graphic Novel
Movie 

Oct: Persepolis

Persepolis
Boomerang Guide

Nov: Speak – PARENTAL ADVISORY

Speak: Graphic Novel
Speak: Novel
Speak: Movie

December: A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol: The Graphic Novel 

January: Nimona

Nimona 

February: March: Book One

March: Book One 

March: Pashmina

Pashmina
American Born Chinese 

April: Anne of Green Gables

Anne of Green Gables: Graphic Novel
Anne of Green Gables Illustrated
Anne of Green Gables Audio
Anne of Green Gables Movie
Netflix Series – Anne with an E

May – Don Brown

Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans
Great American Dust Bowl
Older Than Dirt 

Other series:

The Olympians
Amulet
Bone
Snow White: A Graphic Novel
Drama
Ghosts
Piper
Adventures of John Blake
Maus
Understanding Comics

Grab the Book Planning Page

Don’t miss another live video.

Follow my Facebook Page or YouTube channel:

 

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Using Local Resources in Your Homeschool Plans http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/20/using-local-resources-in-your-homeschool-plans/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/20/using-local-resources-in-your-homeschool-plans/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 19:00:31 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4404 When planning the topics we will study in our homeschool, I try to use ideas from our local resources. If I can study a topic that coordinates with a local museum exhibit, then I double our learning benefits. Our homeschool studies deepen with a related field trip and the field trip is enhanced due to our prior knowledge. It’s a win-win so let’s talk about how to make it work. Let’s talk about searching your city for local resources, events, and exhibits and incorporating them into your homeschool. Using Local Resources Science Museums Art Museums History Museums Rec and Parks Theaters Phrases for Google Searches {Your City Name} Festivals {Specific Type} Festivals {Your City Name} Homeschool Days {Your City Name} Field Trips Grab Your “Around Town” Planning Pages Don’t miss another Facebook Live, follow: Not Before 7: Homeschool Tips from a Nightowl

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When planning the topics we will study in our homeschool, I try to use ideas from our local resources.

If I can study a topic that coordinates with a local museum exhibit, then I double our learning benefits. Our homeschool studies deepen with a related field trip and the field trip is enhanced due to our prior knowledge.

It’s a win-win so let’s talk about how to make it work.
How to use local resources in your homeschool yearly plan.

Let’s talk about searching your city for local resources, events, and exhibits and incorporating them into your homeschool.

Using Local Resources

Science Museums

Art Museums

History Museums

Rec and Parks

Theaters

Phrases for Google Searches

{Your City Name} Festivals

{Specific Type} Festivals

{Your City Name} Homeschool Days

{Your City Name} Field Trips

Grab Your “Around Town” Planning Pages

Don’t miss another Facebook Live, follow:

Not Before 7: Homeschool Tips from a Nightowl

Join me on Facebook for homeschooling tips and resources.

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Staying Motivated During the Homeschool Year http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/20/staying-motivated-homeschool/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/20/staying-motivated-homeschool/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 12:03:19 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4399 The homeschool year kicks off in September with lots of energy, organization, and motivation. But how do we keep that same motivation and energy level throughout the entire year? It’s a great question and there is no magic bullet, but there are lots of ideas we can implement and plan for during the year. Check out the video and see below for links to sites, posts, and resources mentioned in the video: Mentioned in this FB LIVE: Inspiration for Homeschool Moms: The Homeschool Sisters Podcast Brave Writer Podcast Homeschool Solutions Show Homeschool Snapshots A Gracious Space: Fall  7 Secrets the Happiest Homeschoolers Know (FREE) Community Voxer App  Self-Care Simple Ideas Tips from Homeschool Moms 

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The homeschool year kicks off in September with lots of energy, organization, and motivation.

But how do we keep that same motivation and energy level throughout the entire year?

It’s a great question and there is no magic bullet, but there are lots of ideas we can implement and plan for during the year.

Its hard to remain motivated during the homeschool year. Today we talk about some ideas to keep up your energy and motivation all year long.

Check out the video and see below for links to sites, posts, and resources mentioned in the video:

Mentioned in this FB LIVE:

Inspiration for Homeschool Moms:

The Homeschool Sisters Podcast
Brave Writer Podcast
Homeschool Solutions Show
Homeschool Snapshots
A Gracious Space: Fall 

7 Secrets the Happiest Homeschoolers Know (FREE)

Community

Voxer App 

Self-Care

Simple Ideas
Tips from Homeschool Moms 

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Resources for Art in Our Homeschool http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/18/homeschool-art-resources/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/18/homeschool-art-resources/#comments Wed, 18 Jul 2018 11:05:09 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4394 We love art projects and art appreciation in our homeschool. And I have to say that after more than a decade of homeschooling, we’ve dabbled in lots of fun stuff over the years. I popped on Facebook Live to share books, websites, and resources that have worked for the kids in this house from kindergarten through high school. {This post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosure.} You can watch the video or just browse through the video links below. Homeschool Art Resources – Links from this Video DRAWING BOOKS FOR YOUNG KIDS I can Draw Animals  1-2-3-Draw books GREAT ARTISTS BOOKS FOR YOUNG KIDS Katie and the Impressionists  Laurence Anholt books Vincents Colors  13 {artists} children should know Come Look With Me Series  Can You Find it  Mike Venezia books  Imagine a World ART APPRECIATION – ALL AGES Discovering Great Artists Book – Elementary School Combining Great Artists Stories and Projects – Blog Post Art Appreciation with NO PROJECTS  Mixing with the Masters  ART PROJECTS That Artist Woman Website – free ideas from an art teacher Focus on Themed Projects (countries, science, history) Chalk Pastels – art video courses with a variety of themes to choose from ***CODE: artandscience for 25% off through 7/20 Seashore Chalk Pastel Course – blog post Mixed Media Courses ART SCHOOL – Learn the “how to” of drawing, watercolor, pastels, and acrylics Art School with Masterpiece Society SUPPLIES Chalk Pastels Watercolors Watercolor Tubes Modge Podge Craft Acrylic Basic Acrylic Paint  Don’t miss another Facebook Live. Follow my page and […]

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We love art projects and art appreciation in our homeschool.

And I have to say that after more than a decade of homeschooling, we’ve dabbled in lots of fun stuff over the years.

I popped on Facebook Live to share books, websites, and resources that have worked for the kids in this house from kindergarten through high school.

The art resources we have used in our homeschool for kids in kindergarten through high school.

{This post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosure.}

You can watch the video or just browse through the video links below.

Homeschool Art Resources – Links from this Video

DRAWING BOOKS FOR YOUNG KIDS

I can Draw Animals 

1-2-3-Draw books

GREAT ARTISTS BOOKS FOR YOUNG KIDS

Katie and the Impressionists 

Laurence Anholt books

Vincents Colors 

13 {artists} children should know

Come Look With Me Series 

Can You Find it 

Mike Venezia books 

Imagine a World

ART APPRECIATION – ALL AGES

Discovering Great Artists Book – Elementary School

Combining Great Artists Stories and Projects – Blog Post

Art Appreciation with NO PROJECTS 

Mixing with the Masters 

ART PROJECTS

That Artist Woman Website – free ideas from an art teacher

Focus on Themed Projects (countries, science, history)

Chalk Pastels – art video courses with a variety of themes to choose from
***CODE: artandscience for 25% off through 7/20

Seashore Chalk Pastel Course – blog post

Mixed Media Courses

ART SCHOOL – Learn the “how to” of drawing, watercolor, pastels, and acrylics

Art School with Masterpiece Society

SUPPLIES

Chalk Pastels
Watercolors
Watercolor Tubes
Modge Podge
Craft Acrylic
Basic Acrylic Paint 

Don’t miss another Facebook Live.

Follow my page and sign up for notifications.

Join me on Facebook for homeschooling tips and resources.

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Evaluating Our 2017-2018 Homeschool Year http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/15/evaluating-homeschool-year-2017/ http://www.notbefore7.com/2018/07/15/evaluating-homeschool-year-2017/#comments Sun, 15 Jul 2018 18:26:13 +0000 http://www.notbefore7.com/?p=4386 The 2017-2018 homeschool year is over and it’s time to look back. What worked? What didn’t? What will we continue to use and what do we need to ditch? I shared my thoughts on our school year during a Facebook Live. Learn what worked and what didn’t work for our family this year. I realize this is a pretty long video. A lot of folks asked me for a cheat sheet. That’s actually hard to provide because a lot of things we tried were great, but there are specific reasons that they didn’t work for us. Here are a few tips for “skimming” the video: You will find links to everything I talk about below in the order I discuss the curriculum. You can fast forward to the content you are most interested in hearing about. What didn’t work in a nutshell: In general, my Happy Planner was too big. I decided to return to bullet journaling for my home and work schedule. I create a separate planner for school. My loop schedule didn’t work in a loop. Instead, it became a list of ideas to choose from and we focused on what we were inspired to look at that day. Our content areas worked out really well for the most part. I shared some of our favorite things. Notes: What did and didn’t work this year Planning 1. Happy Planner (blog post…update to share that the planner was too big) 2. Planning Forms (love Pam’s forms) 3. Bullet Journal Method (blog post – […]

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The 2017-2018 homeschool year is over and it’s time to look back.

What worked? What didn’t?

What will we continue to use and what do we need to ditch?

I shared my thoughts on our school year during a Facebook Live. Learn what worked and what didn’t work for our family this year.

I realize this is a pretty long video.

A lot of folks asked me for a cheat sheet. That’s actually hard to provide because a lot of things we tried were great, but there are specific reasons that they didn’t work for us.

Here are a few tips for “skimming” the video:

You will find links to everything I talk about below in the order I discuss the curriculum. You can fast forward to the content you are most interested in hearing about.

What didn’t work in a nutshell:

In general, my Happy Planner was too big. I decided to return to bullet journaling for my home and work schedule. I create a separate planner for school.

My loop schedule didn’t work in a loop. Instead, it became a list of ideas to choose from and we focused on what we were inspired to look at that day.

Our content areas worked out really well for the most part. I shared some of our favorite things.

Notes: What did and didn’t work this year

Planning
1. Happy Planner (blog post…update to share that the planner was too big)
2. Planning Forms (love Pam’s forms)
3. Bullet Journal Method (blog post – the method I am returning to)
4. Looping (good idea – needs to be adjusted because it didn’t work for us)
 
Art
Music
2. Musicals
 
History
1. Usborne World Wars (WW1 and 2 book)
2. Candy Bomber (WW2 non-fiction human interest story)
3. A Night Divided (Berlin Wall historical fiction)
4. World History (textbook for high school)
5. Crash Course World History (YouTube)
6. CNN 10 for Current Events (10-minute current event news for students) 

World Geography
1. Around the World Stories (Geography)
4. Pin It Maps (blog post)
5. Fantasy Mapping – This is the first video in the series that we used to create our fantasy maps. 
 
English
1. Brave Writer (Love)
2. Less is More (book – a favorite)
3. Pixar In a Box Storytelling (Kahn Academy – FREE)
4. Annotating Literary Elements (Rooted in Language Product)
6. Philosophy for Kids (guide book)
 
Science
3. Georgia Aquarium (Traveling Homeschoolers
 
Math
1. Singapore
2. Hands-On Equations (blog post)
3. Teaching Textbooks Pre-Alg and Algebra and Geometry
 
Sign Language
1. ASL 1 
3. Switched at Birth (Netflix)

Don’t miss another Facebook Live.

Follow my page and sign up for notifications.

Join me on Facebook for homeschooling tips and resources.

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